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Do not boast about tomorrow, for you do not know what a day may bring. Proverbs 27.1

Job Mar Philoxenos

    job mar philexenos

Late Lamented Job Mar Philoxenos, the more commonly acknowledged Thirumeni Appachan for the people of the churches of the Delhi Diocese was a man of divine insight, and a visionary and a beacon of love and compassion. A metropolitan who upheld and fulfilled the essence of what essentially his name meant, ‘Philoxenos’ i.e. lover of the strangers. He committed himself to the administrative requirements of Delhi Diocese, taking on its reins from the illustrious First Metropolitan of the Diocese H.G. Dr. Paulos Mar Gregorios, after the demise of the latter in 1996.

Under his able guidance, the Delhi Diocese strived at length for the upkeep of the motto of the Church at large and the aims outlined by his predecessor for the Diocese, braving through the multiple ailments he suffered from. His love for humanity can be seen reflected in the social activities he started in Shantigram, a hamlet of land near the Sohna Tehsil, in the state of Haryana. The life and work of Mar Philoxenos reflected the spirit of Mount Tabor Dayara, which emphasized the virtue of dedicating individual lives to an austere discipline, in a common effort toward prayerfully agreed social endeavors. He is remembered for his untiring efforts in striking up personal relationships with active members in each parish of the Orthodox Church, visiting all the Churches and congregations from Jaisalmer, a congregation in the Pakistan border, to UAE. His untiring support of fellow priests through difficult times has not gone unnoticed.

His most significant contribution was to make the memory of his predecessor H.G Paulos Mar Gregorios immortal by organizing the prestigious Dr. Paulos Mar Gregorios Memorial Award. The recipients of the award have been eminent national and international personalities including His Holiness Dalai Lama, social activist Baba Amte, Father of White revolution V. Kurien, Arya Vaidya Shala Kottakal founder P K. Warrier, and statesman Karan Singh. Giving wings to the dream of Late H.G. Paulos Mar Gregorios, he started construction of a Retreat Centre at Aravalli Hills in District Sohna, Haryana, which now is popularly known as Shanti Giri Ashram.

To realize his commitment to the community, he established the Shantigram Social Service Project in Mandavar for the development of a villages in Haryana (40 Km off Delhi). This project involved the purchase of 25 acres of land, the institution of a good English Medium School and an affordable Clinic to serve the people of the village. In his blessed memory, a self-help group for the womenfolk of Mandavar village was inaugurated by former Delhi Chief Minister Sheila Dikshit. The first medical mission of the Orthodox Church in the heart of the Capital was established at Aya Nagar on April 2, 2001 under Thirumeni’s leadership.

Thirumeni was a revolutionary in many aspects and this was evident from several decisions he took during his tenure. Thirumeni looked to the future and to include the future generations of Orthodox members he started a new spiritual organization called the Indian Orthodox Diaspora Secretariat (IODS), conducted conferences and meetings with an eye toward inclusiveness and ecumenism. His vision to cater to the needs of the outside Kerala youngsters and families led him to give shape to the Indian Orthodox Diaspora Movement, which later emerged as a full-fledged spiritual organization, besides the Sunday School, MGOCSM, Martha Mariam Samajam, AMOSS and Orthodox Christian Youth Movement. History was again created when Thirumeni brought women in the Church to the forefront giving approval for inducting young women of the Church into the Youth Movement. To encourage their participation in Sunday worship, Thirumeni issued an order allowing girls to read the Old Testament reading before the start of Qurbana. Thirumeni was ahead of his times in every sense. He was instrumental in opening the Internet as a means to connect to millions of Orthodox believers across the world in an attempt to clear their doubts on issues of faith, under his cheerful spirit and joyful face he always hid the pain and sorrow of his illness. Even in testing times, he conveyed his views on raging social and moral issues such as homosexuality, attack on Christians and need for world peace. Finally, through the melodious voice of Thirumeni we have been blessed to enjoy the sweetness and beauty of our worship. Perhaps, one can call H.G the real Vanampady of Orthodox Church.

The years His Grace dedicated to the Orthodox Church were filled with accomplishments reflecting his quiet commitment to the growth of the Church. He had consecrated over 16 new parishes in the Delhi Diocese, a majority being in the National Capital Region (NCR). It is worthy of mention here the tremendous amount of hard work and effort which went into acquiring the land through active negotiations with officials such as Governors and Ministers, the fund raising, planning and finally the monitoring of the construction that was required in the successful completion of these projects.

He spent his whole life for the spiritual and social development of the society. The dedication shown by His Grace, weaved with commitment had really brought new life for the growth of Orthodox Church. With no doubt we can say that the throughout the entire life Thirumeni would remain in the hearts of millions who had enjoyed the sweetness of his love.

Compiled by: Fr. Thomas Varghese (Gijo)

 

Metropolitan's Message

Dearly Beloved,   "Hope of the Hopeless: The Affirmation of the                                                                          Resurrection" Despite the veneer of peace and prosperity…

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Thought for the Month

                                Shepherds of Significance

The Gospel of St Luke portrays a group of shepherds, who were probably the first people to learn about the birth of a Savior and who visited the new born Baby at the manger and proclaimed the divine birth in public. St. Luke “carefully investigated everything from the beginning” (Luke 1:1-4) and reported in Chapter 2: 8-20 about the specially chosen shepherds who received the great message of universal importance,

“And there were shepherds living out in the fields nearby, keeping watch over their flocks at night. An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord. This will be a sign to you: You will find a baby wrapped in cloths and lying in a manger.” Suddenly a great company of the heavenly host appeared with the angel, praising God and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men on whom his favor rests.” When the angels had left them and gone into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let’s go to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has told us about.” So they hurried off and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby, who was lying in the manger. When they had seen him, they spread the word concerning what had been told them about this child, and all who heard it were amazed at what the shepherds said to them. But Mary treasured up all these things and pondered them in her heart. The shepherds returned, glorifying and praising God for all the things they had heard and seen, which were just as they had been told”.

I really wonder why the angels appeared to a group of unnamed shepherds at night outside a small village called Bethlehem to proclaim a message of universal importance.
Shepherds were poor people who watched over their flock, a job which lacked any sense of respect or dignity from the society. It was perceived to be the last resort for a jobless man. However, shepherds were tough, tough in every sense of the word. They had to stay up all night and all day in order to deal with troublesome animals, fight wolves, lions, and bears to protect his flock. Moreover, shepherds were intimidating. Bishop Craig Satterlee writes, “Society stereotyped shepherds as liars, degenerates, and thieves. The testimony of shepherds was not admissible in court, and many towns had ordinances barring shepherds from their city limits. The religious establishment took a particularly dim view of shepherds since the regular exercise of shepherds’ duties kept them from observing the Sabbath and rendered them ritually unclean. The Pharisees classed shepherds with tax collectors and prostitutes, persons who were “sinners” by virtue of their vocation.” Hence, they belonged to the lower ranks of the society.

But the question remains: Why shepherds?
One could argue that the conception and birth of Jesus Christ was the greatest event in history. God had become a human being, was born in Bethlehem, and was named Jesus. Yet, this good news was proclaimed by angels to these shepherds. If protocol demands, the news of this importance should have been told to the highest authorities in the region, not the world. It should have been announced by the angels to Caesar Augustus in Rome? or to the Roman Governor Quirinius or King Herod? Why didn’t they appear to the Jewish high priest at the Temple? Again the question remains, why shepherds?

The Mishnah, a collection of documents recording oral traditions governing the lives of Jewish people during the period of the Pharisees, considers the possibility that these were not shepherds of ordinary sheep. Alfred Edersheim (1825-1889) provides a fascinating answer to our question in his book’ The Life and Times of Jesus the Messiah. Writing about these shepherds, Edersheim referenced the Jewish Mishnah. One regulation in the Mishnah “expressly forbids the keeping of flocks throughout the land of Israel, except in the wildernesses – and the only flocks otherwise kept, would be those for the Temple-services” .Jerusalem and Bethlehem, and their surrounding fields were not in the wilderness where ordinary flocks of sheep were kept. Therefore, according to the Jewish regulations, the flocks under the care of the shepherds near Bethlehem must have been “for the Temple-services.” These shepherds watched over sheep destined as sacrifices in the Temple at Jerusalem.

Here lay the significance of the Shepherds of Bethlehem. If the flocks of sheeps are kept for the temple services; the shepherds watching over it are also specially chosen for the purpose and not like the nomadic ordinary shepherds of Bethlehem. Edershime wrote, “…everything points to these shepherds watching over sheep used for sacrifice. What would they have thought when they heard: ‘Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord’ ” (2:11). The message of the angels signified, among other things, that the time of animal sacrifices would soon end. The offering of Jesus Christ, the Savior would soon take place. It is no wonder that these shepherds “glorifying and praising God for everything they had heard and seen”. This clearly resonates with the celebratory spirit of Christmas, a traditional time for celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. Let’s remember why he came – not only to live but also to die – the perfect sacrifice for sin, once and for all.

Like the Shepherds of significance, we all are specially chosen for God’s purposes and are dignified enough to hear the good news from God and to proclaim to the world. As the chosen shepherds heard the good news and travelled far to see the incarnated God, let us also set for a search in our life to see the divine Child. Let us hurry and join the shepherds saying:
“Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace to men and women, on whom his favor rests”.

Rev. Fr. Saji Yohannan
(DIOCESAN SECRETARY)